On-Line Condition Reports for Session Two - Fine Paintings & Session Three - 1950s/Modern
Sale Date:
Dec. 5, 2004
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Lot Numbers and Descriptions
Estimate
551. R. Soppolsa (Danish, 20th century), “Two Girls Holding Wildflowers”, c. 1939; oil/canvas, 24” x 30”, signed and dated.
600-800
552. Willem van der Steeg (Dutch, 20th century), “River Landscape”, c. 1930; oil/canvas, signed.
1000-2000
553. John Christen Johansen (American, 1876-1964), “Forest Interior”, c. 1903; oil/canvas laid down on board, 34” x 30” , signed. Chicago painter. Johansen studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Academie Julian, Paris. He exhibited extensively from 1902-48, and his work is in numerous public collections, including that of the White House, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art.
1000-2000
554. Edward Loyal Field (American, 1856-1914), “Landscape with Stream”, c. 1900; oil/canvas, 27” x 22”, signed. Field specialized in tonalist landscapes. He studied in Paris at the Académie Julian and with Carolus-Duran. He exhibited at the Paris Salon, National Academy of Design, Boston Art Club, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, and the Salmagundi Club.
2500-3500
555. George Law Beetholme (British, 19th century), “Waterfall”, c. 1880; oil/canvas, 20” x 13”, signed.
600-800
556. Charles Martin (British, 1820-1906) “Cattle at a Stream”, c. 1880; oil/canvas, 14” x 24”, signed. Charles Martin’s most famous work, “DeSoto Crossing the Mississippi at Baton Rouge”, is very similar in style and composition to this work.
1500-2500
557. Otto Munstedt (American, early 20th century), “Marine”, c. 1936; oil/canvas, 16” x 20”, signed and dated. Munsted was a member of the Society of Independent Artists.
1000-2000
558. Peter Baumgras, (American, 1827-1904), “Trees on a Hillside”, c. 1900; oil/canvas, 11” x 14”, signed and dated. Baumgras came to the U.S. in 1854, and was active in the Washington D.C. area (he was founder of the Washington Art Club). He worked in California painting landscapes and portraits in the 1860s-70s, and eventually ended up in Illinois. He taught at the University of Illinois from 1877-79. REF: A Forgotten American Painter: Peter Baumgras , Pratt.
2000-3000
559. Gaston Bussiere (French, 1862-1929), “Exotic Dancers”, c. 1880; oil/canvas, 45” x 35”, signed. Bussiere attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Lyon and then went to Paris, studying under Alexandre Cabanel. Bussière was greatly influenced by the works of his contemporaries, especially Gustave Moreau. His paintings followed the Symbolist styles. He used French legends and Nordic myths in many of his paintings, which lent themselves to the illustrations he created for many books of his day including “The Splendors and Miseries of Courtesans” by Honoré de Balzac, published in 1897. He exhibited in the Symbolist Salon de la Rose and Croix for two years. This is a superior example of his work.
15,000-25,000
560. Louis Valtat (French, 1869-1952), “Still Life of Flowers”, c. 1930; oil/board, signed. Valtat studied at Ecole des Beaux Arts, and completed his training at the Académie Julian, where he made friends with Albert André and Pierre Bonnard. In 1890, he won the Jauvin d’Attainville prize; he then set up his workshop at rue de La Glacière in Paris. In 1893, he took part in the Salon des Artistes Indépendants for the first time, and then in 1895, Valtat painted numerous pictures with striking colors which were exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants in 1896. Félix Fénéon noticed them and mentioned them in la Revue Blanche. These paintings introduced the Fauvist style .

In March 1899, Paul Signac organized a joint exhibition at la Galerie Durand Ruel where Louis Valtat presented twenty paintings entitled “Notations d’Agay, 1899”. Ambroise Vollard dispatched Valtat’s paintings to the exhibitions which were held in Paris. In 1905, as one of his paintings was reproduced in the magazine “L’Illustration” next to those of Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, André Derain and Jean Puy, and subsequently he became included in the “Fauvism” scandal. In 1924, he bought a house in Choisel, a small village in the Chevreuse valley. He spent the major part of the year there. His garden as well as the flowers and fruits which he grew, became his favorite theme for his paintings. In Choisel, Valtat liked to host his friends, Georges d’Espagnat and Maximilien Luce.
25,000-35,000
561. Ernest Fredericks (American, 20th century), “Hilly Landscape”, c. 1930; oil/canvas laid down on board, 24 x 30, signed.
800-1200
562. Morris Shokler (American, 20th century), “Landscape with Distant Hills”, c. 1930; oil/canvas, 14” x 16”, signed. Cincinnati painter and brother of artist, Harry Shokler. Morris worked in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.
300-500
563. George Howell Gay (American, 1858-1931), “The Quiet Stream”, c. 1900; watercolor/paper, 32” x 16”, signed. Gay studied with Elkins in Chicago, and lived there and in New York. He exhibited at the National Academy of Design, Art Institute of Chicago, and the Boston Art Club (1890s-1910s). Well known as a watercolorist, painting landscapes and marines.
600-800
564. WITHDRAWN
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565. Frank A Barney (American, 1862-1954), “Path in an Autumn Landscape”, c. 1940; oil/board, 9” x 12”, signed. Barney painted in Syracuse, New York. He worked as a WPA artist.
500-700
566. Svend Svendsen (Norwegian/American, b. 1864), “Evening Snow”, c. 1910; oil /canvas laid down on board, 18” x 24”, signed. Studied at the Ed. Ertz at Academie Delecluse, Paris, 1890s. He exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago (1895-1920), Nashville Expo (1897), Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art (1898-1900), and the Milch Galleries , NY (1920s).
400-600
567. Ollie Cole (American, 20th century), “Ship Builders”, c. 1950; oil/canvas, 20” x 16”, signed. Cole lived mostly in Illinois, but she spent some time in Gloucester working with Ken Gore. She met Emile Gruppe at that time.
300-500
568. Edith Maude Miller (American, 20th century), “Sycamores at Big Tujunga”, oil/canvas, 20” x 16”, signed, imperfections. Miller lived primarily in Oklahoma City, but also painted in California.
800-1200
569. Emil O. Thulin (American, early 20th century), “Winter Scene”, c. 1950; oil/canvas, 22” x 26”, signed. Thulin studied at the Academie Julian in Paris, and later lived in Chicago. He exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago in the 1920s.
800-1200
570. Alex Poplaski (American, 1906-1988), “Boat Dock”, c. 1950; oil/masonite, 16” x 20”, signed. Poplaski worked in Old Lyme, CT, as well as Nova Scotia, Vermont, and Massachusetts.
500-700
571. John Califano (American/Italian, b. 1864), “Landscape with Brush”, c, 1897; oil/canvas laid down on board, 9” x 16”, signed and dated; label verso. Califano studied and worked in Italy before moving to Chicago. He also worked in California.
600-800
572. Andrew Thomas Schwartz (American,1867-1942 ), “New England Landscape with a Church”, c. 1920; oil/canvas, 16” x 20”, signed.
600-800
573. Anna Richards Brewster (American, 1870-1952), “Man with a Turban”, c. 1912; oil/board, 20” x 16”, signed and dated. Brewster was the daughter of painter, William Trost Richards. She was associated with the British Pre-Raphaelites at the turn of the 20th century.
700-900
574. J.W. Edwards (American, 19th century), “Fisherman”, c. 1886; oil/canvas, 20” x 14”, signed and dated.
800-1200
575. Grace Dermody (American, 20th century), “Bluebonnets in a Basket”, c. 1940; oil/board, 5” x 7”, signed. Texas painter.
300-500
576. C.F. Schuch (American, 20th century), “Log Wagon”, c. 1940; watercolor, 16” x 25”, signed. Schuch worked in New England, and was most likely influenced by the work of Gruppe, Hibbard, and Sessions.
400-600
577. Pansy Stockton (American, 1894-1972), “Street Scene”, c. 1940; oil/canvas, 20” x 24”, signed. Stockton worked in Durango and Denver, Colorado, and also Santa Fe.
500-700
578. William Henry Walker (American, 1871-1938), “Figure in a Landscape”, c. 1920; oil/canvas, 10” x 12”, signed.
500-700
579. William Arnold Eyden, Jr (American, 1893-1982), “Harbor Scene”, c. 1935; oil/canvas, 24” x 36”, signed. Important Richmond, IN painter and teacher. Eyden studied with J.Bundy and T.C. Steele. He exhibited at the Richmond Art Association (1910s-40s), Hoosier Salon (1925-1981), John Herron Art Institute, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. His work is in numerous public collections throughout Indiana. He had a studio in Greenwich Village for 11 years.
2500-3500
580. Robert Goldman (American, Contemporary), “New Mexico Meadow”, c. 1999; oil/canvas, 16” x 20”, signed.
1000-1500
581. Franklin Van Court (American, b. 1903), “Coastal Scene”, c. 1948; oil/board, 18” x 24”, signed and dated. Chicago artist. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago with Frederic Grant, and the National Academy of Design. He exhibited at the Union League Club (Chicago,1929), and at the Art Institute of Chicago (1931-36).
800-1200
582. Joe Waano-Gano (Native American, 20th century), “Southwestern Landscape”, c. 1940; oil/canvas, 22” x 28”, signed. Los Angeles painter. Waano-Gano was a Cherokee Indian, and his specialty was western landscapes and scenes of Indian life.
1000-2000
583. Charles Allan Winter (American, 1869-1942), “Rocky Landscape with a Stream”, c. 1920; oil/canvas, 20” x 24”, unsigned; this work originated from a direct relative of Alice Beach Winter, the artist’s wife. Winter studied at the Cincinnati Art Academy with Nobel and Nowottny. He worked in Gloucester, MA. He exhibited at the Paris Salon in the 1890s and the Art Institute of Chicago. Winter worked as a fine artist and illustrator and was very successful at both.
1000-2000
584. Laura Hoernig (American, 20th century), “Residence in Taos with Hollyhocks”, c.1940; oil/canvas , 17.5” x 21”, unsigned. Hoernig was a Kansas City painter, but also worked in Taos, New Mexico. Provenance: the estate of the artist.
600-800
585. Karl C. Brandner (American, 1898-1961), “Autumn in Brown County”, c. 1930; oil/board, 9.75” x 11.75”, signed. Landscape painter studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Chicago Fine Art Academy. He exhibited at the Hoosier Salon,Chicago Gallery Association, and the Palette and Chisel Club.
350-550
586. Ollie Cole (American, 20th century), “Still Life”, c. 1950; oil/canvasboard, 20” x 16”, signed. Cole worked in Illinois and Indiana. She studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and with Dorothy Franz at the Brown County Art Club. She worked in Gloucester for some time, while staying at fellow painter, Ken Gore’s place. There she met Emile Gruppe.
300-500
587. Eda Sterchi (American, b. 1885), “Arab Man”, c. 1920; oil/canvas, 17.75” x 14.75”, signed . Sterchi studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and in Paris. She met with early success, exhibiting in 1913 at the American Artists Club and the International Artists Union (both in Paris).
600-800
588. Eda Sterchi (American, b. 1885), “Tunis Architecture”, c. 1910; oil/canvas, 15” x 18”, signed.
500-700
589. American School, “Sailing Ship”, c. 1920; oil/canvas, 25” x 21”, monogramed.
600-800
590. Eda Sterchi (American, b. 1885), “Portrait of an Indian Woman”, c.1940; oil/canvas, 36” x 26”, signed in pencil; partial label with artist’s name and title on stretcher. Provenance: The estate of the artist. Sterchi was born in Olney, a small town in south central Illinois. She left for Chicago in 1908 to attend the Art Institute. Soon afterward, she traveled to Paris to study. She met with early success, exhibiting in 1913 at the American Artists Club and the International Artists Union (both in Paris).
2000-3000
591. Walter Alexander Bailey (American, b. 1894), “Winter Sunlight”, c. 1930; oil/board, 16” x 20”, signed. Bailey studied at the Kansas City Art Institute with Thomas Hart Benton and Charles Wilimovsky. He exhibited from the 1920s-40s, and also worked as an illustrator.
1400-1800
592. Fred Greene Carpenter (American, 1882-1965), “Street Scene”. c. 1942; oil/canvas, 22” x 32”, signed and dated. Carpenter was one of Richard Miller’s closest students. Miller taught at the St. Louis School of Fine Art before traveling to France. Carpenter followed Miller to France and then returned to St. Louis to essentially replace Miller at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1904. His figurative subjects, strong brushwork, and unique palette reflect the influence of Miller, but Carpenter eventually moved to a more severe strain of modernism.
2500-3500
593. Phil Starke (American, b. 1957), “Native American Couple”, c. 1999; oil/canvas, 20” x 24”, signed. Contemporary impressionist. Starke studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the American Academy of Art (Chicago). He lives in Arizona.
600-800
594. Paul Jacoulet (French, 1902-1960), “Figures on a Beach”, c. 1940; color woodcut, 15.5” x 12”, signed.
400-600
595. Helen Hyde (American, 1868-1919), “Mexican Girl”, c. 1912; oil/board, 20” x 10”, signed. Painter and printmaker. Hyde worked in San Francisco and in Chicago. She was well known for child subjects, done in Japan, Mexico, and the Carolinas.
2000-3000
596. Henry Rodman Kenyon (American, 1861-1926), “Boats at Dock”, c. 1925; oil/board, 10” x 12”, signed. Kenyon worked in Providence, R.I. and in Rockport , MA.
1000-2000
597. Leonard Reedy (American, 1899-1956), “Stagecoach”, c. 1950; watercolor/paper, 8” x 10”, signed. Well known western painter, frequently worked in watercolor. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Chicago Academy of Fine Art
500-700
598. American School, “S.S. James C. Wallace”, c. 1930; oil/board, 26” x 20”, unsigned.
600-800
599. Franz Krischke (Hungarian/Austrian, 1885-1960), “Still Life with Objects”, c. 1950; oil/canvas, 24 x 20, signed.
800-1200
600. Konrad Cramer (German/American, 1888-1963), “San Javonina”, c. 1950; watercolor/paper, 12” x 18”, unsigned, estate stamp. Cramer came to the U.S. in 1911, and became a central figure to the Woodstock Artist’s Colony. He introduced a cubist element to the landscape painting of that group. He was a good friend of Stieglitz, and became an accomplished photographer as well.
1000-2000
Sale Date:
Dec. 5, 2004